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. not for those two reasons . we don't have too much vacation or little. we do it just right. europe had work like we did. you want lopping beer vacation you can have a stagnant economy like europe. we rise taxes we'll havave loer vacation but fewer jobbings. >> you are right. we don't want to be like the french. and people here in the united states and government union. and i was on vacation and check my blackberry and read a rick unger e-mail while on vacation. >> you are never on vacation. >> you work it anyway. nine out of the 10 are checking their work phones. any time to rejuvenate and comeack ragged. >> we need that vacation time to work better. >> when you say economy you arealking about gdp. good or ill it is major transaction. have everyone never talk a day off and work 60 hours a week. steve is protesting that. >> there is it a correlation between vacation time and increased productity. a 2010tudy show that americans fe refreshed and better about their jobs coming back it is important to take eaks throughout the work die. >> center to tell you, i don't think i had a year where i used up
's what is scary. the backdrop of the presidential year was europe. we know where this path leads. all this turmoil, the huge welfare and the low productivity and high unemployment that comes along with them, that was the backdrop of the presidential campaign. voters voted, and they said, yes, we are going to keep moving in that direction, kim. where do you think the electorat is here? is it be ibd hue the choices that -- is it behind the choices that jason suggested they might be? >> barack obamaus won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. if you went out and asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obama care? most would say no. but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm going to still try to make them better, and a guy who he painted as not having a plan and not identifying with the average wants and needs of most middle class ame
. and so, they were desperate for the united states to open up the second front to western europe and the british. roosevelt's stalin to send molotov the top general to washington in may of 42 and in june of 40 to the united states issued a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war, before the end of the year 1942. we promise that publicly and get we don't open up the second front until june of 44 and that is partly because the british refused to go along with this. the united states and the british get involved in what marshall calls peripheral and marshall and eisenhower opened up a second front and the united states when instead to basically defend the british empire. there was going to be a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets particularly during the war. the seeds of the cold war actually are visible during the war. in certain tensions of course because the second front is the soviets had on their own and largely defeated the germans after stalingrstalingr ad and for pushing toward central europe and easter
to society? it is very difficult to give any sort of charity for any charitable purposes in europe. it is very difficult to give service in europe. when i was asking people, they said, why would we serve? there is a bureau for that. there are some places in europe burk it is illegal to give volunteer service. as i see the united states going in the same trend of all sourcing -- outsourcing, it is so overregulated and so over controlling of your life, it takes away your freedom to even support yourself, how would you propose the government relinquished power is that it has taken over peacefully? how do you think the government would be able to let go of this control of our lives? >> i agree with every syllable you just said. [laughter] you almost provoked me to be more political than i felt comfortable doing in this chapel. leave more space, more breathing room for civil society. this astonishing combustion of voluntary association. in my remarks, i used the analogy of a tree. in the shade of which, smaller things cannot grow. that is the danger of an excess of state. >> [inaudible]
in europe. at least at the 2013 predictions are borne out. she may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, a sovereign debt, and banking crisis, but the journey is far from over. >> problems will come again from the financial crisis. we do not know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy. >> 2013 they also be the year when germany starts to feel what much of the world has suffered through, the pain of a
china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that. that is why energy is more expensive because we import a lot of that. if every country is doing that, its race to the bottom how quickly they can devalue their currency. >> we trade with so many different nations. we trade with europe and certainly with china. look at our trade imbalance and you can figure that out. europe has only a handful of countries that are doing decently? >> there is about six. they are in the nor
the system, whether, for example, china last year was going to go into a recession, whether europe can kind of keep it together through recession. i think we've gotten past through most of those things and i think it's slow and steady u.s. economic growth picture is probably the best bet, but i think it's going to feel better to the average person because of the component to that growth, meaning housing, autos, and finally jobs. looking like they're going a decent up spring. i think a slow and steady but feeling better than the past couple of years. >> it definitely does feel better. ezra, uncertainty seems to have been the theme this year. businesses don't like it. investors don't like it. how much uncertainty do you expect in 2013 for the political and for consumers? >> plenty. the world is an uncertain place. to mike's point, i agree. i think the fundamentals both here and global are looking pretty strong. the problem is we're seeing essentially simultaneous deterioration in political systems across the world. obviously europe has been having a number of problems, but i wouldn't exactly
is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to assuage the board m, then they may become susceptible to the excitements of politics that promise assets meaning and spurs alleviations of a human condition berefts and therefore barren. we know from bitter experience of blood soaked 20th century the political consequences of this if it's meaninglessness. political nature of who are vacuum and a vacuum of meaning is filled by secular fighting faiths. fascism gave its adherence a meaningful life. communism taught it's adherence to derive meaning from the participation in the drama of history's unfolding destiny. the political paradox is this, secularism advanced in part as moral revolution against
? >> well -- >> isn't it true in europe, for example, the contrary is true? >> yes, if you force religion down their throats they don't like it and give the freedom to choose they quite often choose to be religious. >> what percentage of americans are affiliated with a church today? >> four out of five say their christian and a slight majority are members of a church. >> what is the situation in europe? >> much, much grimmer from the christian perspective. >> no religious affiation and 20% denied jesus ever existed. >> that's right, that's right. >> what are you finding, go ahead. >> no, i was going to sa9 scandinavian countries, for example, peopleardly ever go to church and no one's interested in jesus. >> what are you finding with regard to the doctrine of reincarnation and christian? >> a quaer of christians believe in reincarnation. >> one out of four christians believe in reincarnation, what is reincarnation? >> after you die your soul continues and finds another body and is born as another person. >> how do you reconcile christian beliefs and reincarnatn wh a belief in jesus? >> it
, we're going to get those types of storms and europe will particularly suffer from them. but when you get a hurricane embedded within one, then you get double dose and that's what happened with sandy and that kind of thing will happen, too if we get stronger cyclonic storms. and the damage goes like the cube of the wind speed. so it's not like -- you know, if the wind speed had been 10 miles per hour less, we wouldn't have had all that damage. those trees have been standing there for centuries. these were really big trees on our property. so there haven't been storms like that, or those trees wouldn't still have been there. >> and was there a human fingerprint on sandy? could you say how much climate change contributed to the ferocity and the intensity of sandy? >> well, there's a human fingerprint in several ways. the ocean was unusually warm along the eastern seaboard and it was warmer by more than the global average, so people are saying, oh, you can only credit one quarter of that to global warming. well, the warming, it's like, these extreme events that we're getting, we're getti
'll close with this. we have a -- a different form of government than they have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. if you're in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. it's one party rules everythingmeneverything.you hav. you have the speaker -- the equivalent of the speaker -- and the leader all in one party. and then you don't compromise, you put that out there and you get your program through. if there's a lack of confidence, the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we had because at least there would be some action and you would know what to expect and you wouldn't have this uncertainty. because each party has its dreams, its hopes, its plans. and they would have the chance to get those policies through. we don't have that here.we have to meet each other halfway. because the house is run by the republicans and it will be next time. the senate is run by the democrats but it is not a supermajority. we have to deal with our colleag
epidemic and that 10,000 people might be affected by this we call the warehouse in europe and ask for 2500 kits of kits of cholera. >> where you going on that side of the ocean? >> yes, exactly. >> uh-huh. >> and you have every single thing you need to deal with cholera outbreak. and starting from the bucket to the tent and to the antibiotics and injections material, et cetera. >> uh-huh. >> this is how we did with logistics. >> what do you do, i assume you have more than one crisis. you look at the state of the world and constantly hear of places in need. you didn't go to church or place of worship. people are not as well off as we are, even though we're dealing with the economic crisis. they're worse there and what do do you when several people need your help? >> there is so many crisis and they tend to last. we have been in somalia in the democratic republic of congo in sued an for more than -- sudan for more than three decades now, right? at the same time, there is a series of new crisis or recent chris ones in ivory coast and there is another major crisis this year. for us, it's a big
to tuesday, showers will increase. where the rest of europe, we're looking at an ice conditions. non-profite, pro-people. >> welcome back. the top stories are now the zeroth, wounded dr. 21 of his colleagues were found shot dead in a remote tribal region. the officers were kidnapped on thursday. hundreds of suny muslims -- sunni muslims protesting that they're getting targeted for arrest. they have been protesting for days. prayer is being held in india for a gang rape victim who died from her injuries. her body was cremated after being flown back from singapore. six men are being charged with her murder. let's get more now on the security situation in pakistan. they say it is unlikely that the government would engage with talks with the taliban. >> basically, this is part of a concern of an organized campaign mounted by terrorists, whoever they are coming to demoralize the securities and also to defeat any attempt by the government to crack down on them. the second objective of this campaign seems to be putting fear and terror in the minds of common people live this is what we have
for the future of the world and share it with us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers fr
of diplomacy helped broker a cease-fire. number three, in europe greece was the problem child that spent too much, save nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership didn't stop constant violent protests, staged by those facing loss of jobs, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. europe's leaders including the new french president committed to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? number two. the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its use of air power. >> one of the questions most asked in 2012, was how much longer can this man hold on to power? assad was under intense pressure to step down. but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition. civilians caught in the crossfire. more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> this is, yet, another bread line. >> the opposition fights on making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of additional support for the international community. number one -- she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shocked. she
and there is some turmoil over europe's economy and the founder of wikilocations continues to be under siege. en toa krause looks at the year's major world news. >> reporter: terrorists launched a deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya on september 11th. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed. the arab spring triggered civil war in syria. more than 40,000 people died as rebels try to force out dictator assad. u.s. troops are now in neighboring turkey. the muslim brotherhood rose to power in egypt after the country's first free election. but hundreds of thousands are rejecting president morci's iron hand. israeli forces bombed gaza for eight straight days in november. retaliating after hamas militants fired long-range rockets across the border. forensic experts exhumed the body of yasser arafat to try to determine if he was poisoned eight years ago. north korean celebrated the firing of a long-range rocket into orbit. many believe the communist nation is advancing its nuclear technologies. taliban gunmen tried to assassinate a pakistani school girl who spoke out ag
to happen here. there's a huge stake. everyone realizes. europe has got its problems. germany starting to feel the effects of the global, of the downturn in europe. china, cutting its growth forecasts, india doing the same. the last thing anyone on the world stage needs right now is for the u.s. to start sliding back into recession. but you know, let's be clear here. that's, that would take some time. there would still be time for some kind of a deal. but it's the uncertainty that is really driving everybody's nerves in all of this. it's going to affect commodity prices in countries like brazil. countries like russia, everybody is in this together. waiting to see what happens up there. >> you're absolutely right. we're going to be watching those international markets to see how everybody is reacting. it's this whole big chain, jim, thank you for that back home, the senate is still trying to work towards a deal as jessica just told us, senator harry reid earlier said that he is in fact hopeful about reaching a deal. listen. >> with 36 hours left until the country goes over the cliff, i
&p 500 which is a lot of people's 401(k)s is up more than 12% for 2012 and all of the nonsense in europe and the fiscal cliff, and the market is better than the long term average in 2012. i keep saying that if washington does not mess it up, 2013 could be a good year for america. >> you are absolutely right. so what we might find is that we might hit volatility in january and a rough month, but you know what, don't despair, because i think that as we move on, and listen, we will get through this and this is not the end of the world, b world, but the market will have to reprice the risk based on what they see. after that, then the market will start to make headway and we will see some turn around in china, right. seeing some turn around there already, and seeing the green shoots in the united states, but the only thing that we have to wor with ri about is europe and they are in recession and if they come out that is only going to add to the story. >> kenny, i love the optimism and you have seen many of these things come and go and it is useless and ridiculous to be in the position, but as
in europe. she posted 700 pictures of herself, three of them she had beer in her hand or one in her hand and innocent photos. she is on a tour of a guinness factory and she lost her job as a teacher. you think that your 18-year-old or 21 or older child or grandchild can just take down a facebook page when they go job hunting, there is a company, social intelligence inc., which saves the last seven years of facebook pages. so then it becomes available to their employer when they are 22 years old. that, we have heard about. when i started doing research, i had no idea there was this whole other aspect, which was that what you do on the web is followed by data miners. i am a writer. i love dictionary.com. i've written books, but it puts 200 tracking mechanisms on your computer to follow where you go. google makes $36 billion a year, 90% of its income, from selling information. what does that mean? me that i look of a medical condition that health insurers can get that information and use it to discriminate. even the advertisements aren't innocent. when young people say they are going to com
ports of the world, india, europe, china, who wanted to stay here after they graduated and work on their companies, create new start-ups, but they were unable to do so because after you graduate you get a job with an existing company or you leave and for many them that was not a good option and they left and took their ideas and companies with them. >> so they get their fancy education here and go back to indian or somewhere else. >>guest: we would like to stem the tide and keep them closer, and bring them back to the united states so they can create new jobs. and new companies. >> if they worked for a company they could have stayed? >>guest: if you get sponsored by a large corporation you can get the prop visas to work in the country but you cannot self sponsor and you cannot be here and create your own start-ups without going through some pretty significant legal work. >> to build this big ship where people live cost as lot of money and people are actually giving you money for this? >>guest: the face book funder and creator of pay pay pal is helping us and bringing in a number
of the best of europe. venice seems to be every italy connoisseur's... prague has always been beautiful... germany... the irish civilization... the eiffel tower was built... hope you've enjoyed the magic of... no trip to this city of art is complete without a visit to its greatest museum. when the medici family ruled florence from this palace, their offices, or uffizi, were next door, connected by this skyway. today, these offices hold the finest collection of italian paintings anywhere, the uffizi gallery. the uffizi's collection, displayed on one comfortable floor, takes you on a sweep through art history from the 12th through the 17th century. these altarpieces are gothic. being pre-renaissance, they simply tell their story through symbolism rather than realism. the gold-leaf sky isn't realistic, but it implies a rich and holy setting. the angels are stacked, like a totem pole. on this altarpiece, these panels tell the story of the crucifixion, but they don't create any sense of depth. yet artists were trying. to show jesus' head leaning out, it actually does. giotto, often considere
england and the united states are different places but europe is kind of on the vanguard of the secularism movement, and to the degree that their leading religious institution looks irrelevant or out of step with the times, i think that there's important lessons for us here aut h religious groups and religious institutions accommodate themselves to the wider culture and one of the things that you're gonna see that on here at home, i think in 2013, is the gay marriage question, which is gonna be headed to the supreme court. so to what degree religious institutions can adapt to the larger culture is i think gonna be, there's gonna be a lot there. >> but for a lot of these religious institutions they don't adapt to the wider culture. you know, they take pride in saying, "well, we're counter cultural because we stand for what we believe is right, whether or not the culture agrees." and i think you're right. that's where it really, you know. >> that's where the tsion is. >> the clash comes when you talk about gay marriage because for a lot of religious institutions this is a faith issue, an iss
the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are glad to take the money out of equity and buy pane
trading rtners, britain and europe and canada -- they are only 16%. so there is a ry good reason why just about every industrial country has a really low capital gains tax rate. that's because policymakers just about everywhere know that low capital gains tax rates are crucial for a growth of economy and entrepreneurship and high-thnology industries. gerri: so what if we compare favorably with a lot of developed countries out there -- what would be the practical effect? >> it will slow the ow of venture capital and investment for high-technology companies. if you think about every major high-tech company like apple or microsoft or ebay or amazon, they were all nurtured by high income people putting money in early on to these startup companies. we dramatically cut the capital gains tax rate from 40% to 20% before, so what we are going to do is kill america's entrepreneurial economy. gerri: l's get into the details of this. why you would want to keep these capital gains taxes low. you say it is an issue of double taxati. >> that's right. corporate profits are taxed at the corporate level. a
at the vatican. about 40,000 young pilgrims from all across europe attended an open air mass conducted by pope benedict. they cheered as the pope waved to the crowd from his popemobile and the crowd gathered in st. peter's square, part of a mission to promote peace. time now for the weather and over to ginger zee. >> i had to start out with pure cuteness on this one. we have to head to rhode island where they had some snow last night in some places quite a bit enemma claire is experiencing it for the first time. yes, her dad just wanted to send us a little ireport and let us know how emma -- she is very fascinated he said. she gets down, starting touching it and playing with it. many more years of snow if you're staying in rhode island. thanks for sending that. another storm to watch for. now the other one has moved off the northeast and through new england, parts of north texas and the western part of oklahoma now with some winter weather add advisories in place. it's going to dampen out as it heads to the east. quite a bit of rain from dallas and parts of the gulf eventually. so as far as ne
an extensive traveler, works in africa, africa, south and east asia, europe and of course the middle east. by far the largest part of her work has been as an author, both acknowledged and if i may put it this way is a quiet partner. she has in either way more than 60 books to her credit and a number of genres, poetry, fiction, both adult and children's and a book of an adult romantic chirla g. if i remember craig -- correctly and tales of the king. a lot of her work has been nonfiction and that too has covered a variety of subjects. some of her nonfiction has dealt with the issue of single motherhood. but a good deal is still somehow or other with the issue of religion and the life of politics and social life. this is including the book, difficulty journalists frequently have and probably understanding religion as a motive in offense. is called blind spot, done together with her birder amundsen and my colleague who is here today, coal martial. it was published and won several literary prizes. it has also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieut
of legislators. i will close with this -- we have a different form of government than they have in europe. this is not a parliamentary system. in a parliamentary system, one government rules everything. one party rules everything. you have the prime minister, you have the speaker, and the leader. all in one party. and then it you do not compromise -- you put that out there and you get your program through. if there is a lack of confidence the people can change parties. the next party comes in and does what it wants. that is not what we do here. sometimes i wish it was the form of government we have because at least there would be some action and you would now. you would not have some uncertainty -- each party has its dreams and hopes and plans. they would have to change to get this policy through. we have to meet each other halfway. the house is run by the republicans. is -- the senate is run by the democrats but is not a super majority. the president is a democrat. we have to work together. that is the name of the game. if we can do it on the highway bill -- if they can do it on the farm
to the united states, europe, china. they're just dumping this money to the system to keep it going. as you mentioned, housing tarts , housing prices. tom: i have to tell you, i think i'm in yur camp on this one. i'm a be gloomier than the one housing because i don't see the fundamentals re still wrong. the people that are buying homes are investors paying all cash. maybe some starter homes, but the mortgages are still tough to get. the appraisers are still tough appraisals to get. and you have one at the three people in this country under water. i still don't see the fundamentals of the old buy and sell transaction sapping get. >> vote for me. on make things better. >> exactly. >> year 100 percent right. the onlyeason the housing market is going up is because interest rates are so. i'veeen of state kingston on one of the most historic quarters in the united states. the only pace on each corner where they're is a stone building thatreed -- predate the revolution, and that just bought one. seventeen fifties building. i just got a commercial loan at three 1/4%. they cover closing costs. ten y
as evil and people can make fun of them. when you're in europe they always make fun -- they always make fun of how fat americans are. small things, however, are seen as somewhat heroic. terror groups are seen as freedom fighters because they are small. o. w. s., because it was a tiny faction seen as corporate activism is always seen as the david. dana perino -- [laughter] the immediate embraces david over goliath even if david is evil. if america were a house, the left would root for the termites. i used that before. i thought it worked. i'm not trying to say that the left are bad people. i'm guessing they aren't people. [laughter] [applause] >> no, no, no. not too. i use that, why i say that is i use that because that's what they do. it's time which is stored back at them. even if it's a joke. [applause] they are people. they are people. they are some of my favorite people but they don't own, they don't own the turf that is ready to. so why is it cool versus uncool importantly it won an election. the reason people like barack obama is he is cool. he beat a war hero, a community activis
as efficient as the rest of the nation. it's about equivalent to europe, which is also twice as efficient as the united states. so there's a lot of potential in just energy efficiency but anyway. >> and so the next question, welcome. >> i'm james. the ongoing talks in doha, basically focusing on kyoto, i believe, you've said you sort of have issue with kyoto, what do you think the united states should be putting forward there, and how can we convince the countries who have equity issues with the united states and our carbon development to participate? what do you propose for that? >> the united nations process hasn't done a lot. what do you think should happen there? >> yeah, it's -- they -- as i've already said, i think instead of trying to fix the kyoto process but keeping the cap-and-trade system, we need to realize that we have to put a price on carbon. now, we do have a debt to developing countries because the climate impacts are actually going to be felt and are already beginning to be felt more at the low latitude countries where more of the developing nations are, and yet, they ha
. there is a similarity to what is happening in europe with what could happen here if we do not get our house in order. but we certainly are not greece. >> enough talk about this single-minded focus. and yet you -- you have talked about this single-minded focus. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans. all these efforts i have been part -- all of these efforts that i have been a part of. one reason i did not run again is because i wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours i have been a part of. they developed a work product to those who are negotiating. many of the ideas we generated will be part of a solution before the end of this year or early next. the work product we produced will be a part of the solution. >> you talk about missing 80% of family birthdays, but will you -- what will you be doing next? >> i don't know. some speaking, some teaching. one thing i can assure you i will not be doing is lobbying. beyond that, i have made that clear tha
change, a hair-dressing set. that's not some obscure toy store. it's one of the largest in europe and part of the toys are us empire. you wouldn't see that kind of gender-bending mass marketing in america, right? the author of pink and blue. she says the only reason we think of boys in bluees and girls in pink is because of mass marketing. in the 1920s a common custom babies with brown eyes wore pink. baby with blue eyes wore blue. their gender didn't matter. parents didn't focus on it like they do today. we talk about mask lint and femininity. they didn't believe babies had that. they believed there was something that emerged. >> parents dressed boys and girls the same in their younger years and it didn't seem to harm the kids. >> this little boy's mother put him in something that looks like a dress. he grew up to be our 32nd president franklin d. roosevelt. >> but manufacturers began too realize if they can agree on how to separate clothing and toys by gender they could sell more to everyone. pink and blue could have gone the other way. there was a good bit of pink on men in the
, the current news media, we're not spain, we're not greece, we're not totally messed up like europe. this is a country where if we could just get government to quit screwing up, we would do fine over the next 20 years. [applause] but imagine the consultant report if they came out and said, you know, general washington, we've evaluated the situation, and you have one axe and 14,000 people. we think this is bad. [laughter] we think you should be deeply depressed and consider quitting. [laughter] a congress that isn't doing well enough to be worthy of at least a couple hundred axes doesn't deserve your loyalty. why don't you go home. now, these people wanted to be free, and they were prepared to die. when they cross the delaware on christmas night in a desperate last effort before the army ceases to exist, their slogan, their password is victory of death. victory or death. and they meant it. it wasn't victory or i'll cry for six weeks. [laughter] it wasn't victory or i'm not going to watch fox news for a month. [laughter] it wasn't victory or i think i'll pout. [laughter] these people
who is there client. >> so far a few have been cold in europe and the u.s., and orders keep coming in even though there is skepticism on the streets. >> i think it's creepy. i don't like that idea at all. it seems a bit like big brother. >> it's weird. >> especially if i was shopping in the underwear section. >> and one retailer said it won't use it worried it might be an invasion of privacy. >> it's weird, like the movie where everybody is watching you. it's concerning. >> in this economy, the last thing stores want to do is scare people away. >> i think if you are doing things customers are not comfortable, i think you crossed the line. >> and some say it's a good idea. >> if you need them, you can ask where something is. >> and there are real people to ask them. >> and we are videotaped dozens times a day and we don't know it. >> one thing about the stores they have to post that they are video taeupg you, and once it's posted it could be a camera in the corner, or a mannequin. be careful. >>> it's bone chilling cold. >> and we are saying aus stau law sraesa stot snowstorm. comin
into europe. that we'll be over taxed and people that can spend and create jobs in this country aren't going to want to. they won't have the liquidity and won't have the will because they'll want their own things to continue. let's see if we can watch senator graham. >> the sad news for the country is we've accomplished very little in terms of not becoming greece. it's a victory for the president and i hope we have the courage of our convictions to fight for what we believe as republicans. >> peter, what the senator is saying is this doesn't really solve the problem of the debt we're building up. >> no, it doesn't. we have all heard taxing high income individuals more would only raise 5% of the deficit. another statistics that will break your eyes. if we raised everybody's income tax by 50%, we'd likely only cut the deficit in half. that should explain to everyone why it is imperative we finally do something about rapidly escalating entitlement cost but the president refuses to come to the table. nothing is fixed in my mind more than speaker boehner saying i've offered you 800 billion in add
. today armenian food has food from the mediterranean, middle east and europe. >> this is san francisco with the largest armenian food festival and widely recognized as one of the best food festivals in the area. we have vendors that come up from fresno, los angeles. we have everyone here in the neighborhood. that's really what it is, is drawing people to see a little bit of our culture and experience what we experience weekend in and weekend out. >> we are behind the scenes now watching the chef at work preparing some delicious armenian. this is a staple in armenian cooking, right? >> absolutely since the beginning of time. soldiers used to skewer it on swords. we have chicken ka bob, beef, lam, onions, parsley, over 2 pounds of meat being cooked in three days. >> after all that savory pro seen, i was ready to check out the fresh veggie options. * protein this is armenian. tomatoes and olive oil, that makes it summer food. what i'm doing is i'm putting some latinae. it's kind of like cream cheese without. when they offer you food, you have to eat it. they would welcome you and food is
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